The science behind Achieve in 5!

reticular-activating-system-functionI developed the concept for Achieve in 5! in 1995. I put it into a system in 2005 and wrote a small free ebook about it in 2010. In 2012, I rewrote the book and published it under NewWay Press. Although I talked about the concept of Achieve in 5! and in part I talked about why it works, what I haven’t previously discussed, except in small circles, is the science behind Achieve in 5!.

Achieve in 5! is designed for those life changing goals, and while it works great for things like cleaning that avalanche danger zone called a closet, it works even better for that huge goals that you’ve wanted to accomplish but either you don’t have the time to devote four hours a day to make it happen, or you have some fear, or you just don’t know how to get started. I am going to reveal the reason why Achieve in 5! works particularly well for those goals.

Once you start on the road to Achieve in 5! your mind goes to work to help you achieve your desired outcomes.

You set into place a series of events as soon as you follow steps 1 – 3:
1) Visualize what you want…
2) Crystalize your dream and mark your finish line…
3) Chart your course and mark your milestones…

Before you begin to work toward that first milestone five minutes a day, every day, the part of your brain called the reticular activating system (RAS) will have kicked-in. The reticular activating system is a set of neurons between the brain stem and the cortex. It is said to be responsible for the brain and body’s sleep – wake transitions. The RAS is also responsibility for helping the brain identify information and recognize like information. For example, when your RAS is activated to some information, phenomenon, or thought, it begins to awaken to other similar information, objects, or events. It heightens awareness to those things of interest to you.

Laura Goodrich in her book and video calls it Seeing Red Cars. Her analogy is that only after you buy a red car do you notice how many of them are on the road. In this same way, once you begin spending five minutes a day on your project, you will begin to think about it more and more each day. You will make connections with people who can help you achieve it, or you will read an article that will answer a question you have related to your project, you may even notice that there are more television shows that directly relate to your project.

Once your RAS is activated around your goal, your brains searches for connections and you essentially spend passive hours working toward your goal so that when you sit down for your five minutes you make more progress than you could have imagined.

Are you ready to activate your RAS to help you achieve your goal? Follow steps 1 – 3 and by the time you begin your five minutes you will notice that your RAS is working with you to achieve your goal.


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The science behind Achieve in 5! — 6 Comments

  1. As you get in touch with what is exciting and rewarding to you, you increase your levels of arousal, and become crystal clear about what matters. As you are doing this, your reticular activating system in your cortex is aroused and promotes you being ready and alert to respond to cues in the environment that are relevant to your goals. When the RAS is activated, we can process and reorganize information much more efficiently in ways that support our achievement of goals.

  2. As you get in touch with what is exciting and rewarding to you, you increase your levels of arousal, and become crystal clear about what matters. As you are doing this, your reticular activating system in your cortex is aroused and promotes you being ready and alert to respond to cues in the environment that are relevant to your goals. When the RAS is activated, we can process and reorganize information much more efficiently in ways that support our achievement of goals.

  3. Part of your brain known as the Reticular Activating System (RAS) plays a vital part in your ability to achieve your goals. The RAS brings relevant information to your attention, acting like a filter between your conscious mind and subconscious, for example: being able to hear and pick out your name being announced out of general background noise at a busy airport passenger terminal.

  4. Your Reticular Activating System acts as a filter between your conscious and unconscious mind, which can be effected by stress. That’s why it’s very important when you begin the process of setting goals that you are in a restful state and are reasonably stress free. As stress interferes with the filtering process between the conscious and unconscious mind and creates false expectations, which is often when goals are not achieved.

  5. Your Reticular Activating System acts as a filter between your conscious and unconscious mind, which can be effected by stress. That’s why it’s very important when you begin the process of setting goals that you are in a restful state and are reasonably stress free. As stress interferes with the filtering process between the conscious and unconscious mind and creates false expectations, which is often when goals are not achieved.

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